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Learn to be Hospitable

To some, hospitality comes naturally. Others by necessity must be trained, haha. I think one of the worst experiences one can have while traveling is dealing with people in the travel and transportation industry who exhibit obvious lack of hospitality skills. I’m sure you know exactly what I mean. The airplane or hotel can have the most lavish lobby, the most lush accommodations, or be the most wonderfully discounted opportunity in the world, but if you are served by cantankerous, sneering, or dirty service representatives, you can kiss that good experience goodbye. Any business that is serious about their service would, I think, invest in hospitality training of their employees, and mandate 100% satisfaction with the service. Based on some of my own experiences, I’d say that hospitality training is on the bottom tier of quite a few travel and hotel venues. Hospitality is EVERYTHING in the travel world. TripAdvisor reviews are predominantly filled with the bad experiences of travelers; the common denominator? Bad service. Dirty rooms. These are easily solved by hospitality training and skills. A decorative lobby or an attractive museum may make a good first impression, but that impression is all too brief. People are social creatures. A friendly, helpful, and congenial service rep is worth more than the marble walls and tinkling crystal chandeliers! We travelers know this!

Resources abound at hospitalitymanagementschools.net, both online and on campus. it is egregious for a business to neglect to train the staff. So here’s my little message to anyone in the travel and transportation businesses: train your staff! Teach them to be hospitable! Monitor customer satisfaction! Believe me, it could make or break your business.

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About the Author

I've been traveling throughout New York State since I got the travel bug after touring the Herkimer Home on a school field trip as a youngster. We've been blogging about our travels since 2006 and have visited over half of New York's 62 counties so far.

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